Thanksgiving is here; a day full of foot

Thanksgiving is here; a day full of football, family, and of course, food. Having this particular holiday on the brain I am compelled to delve into food art, a medium that I have never had the guts to play around with aside from carving rudimentary pictures into the crust of pies. I believe at one time or another we’ve all seen edible sculptures made out of watermelons, cantaloupes, and honeydew melons. These items are commonly used because they provide a durable carving material, but artist Christel Assante prefers to work with a more delicate food item when creating art. She carves gorgeous, detailed, and delicate scenes into egg shells. Assante uses a most fragile material that also happens to be quite a bit smaller than any melon; she predominately uses quail and goose eggs for her custom pieces. Concentration, deliberate action, and great care are all required in order to execute her designs. When one looks upon Assante’s work it is easy to recognize the elements of control and discipline within the artwork itself—every line, cut, and mark serves a purpose, there is nothing superfluous. Christel Assante devotes much time and effort into her work, just like many of us devote hours to perfecting our “food art” that we display on Thanksgiving. Both Assante and the rest of us enjoy food art, it’s just that one type is merely to be enjoyed with our artistic eyes, and the other is meant for hungry eyes and bellies. Make sure to thank your family’s “food artist” for their hard work today, and have a Happy Thanksgiving!
Article Contributed by Alexandra Dailey. To read more articles by Alexandra, visit her blog at http://alexdailey.wordpress.com.
To read more articles, presented by Contemporary Art Gallery Online, visit us at http://www.contemporaryartgalleryonline.com.
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